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Open-loop GSHP potential (West Midlands)

Click on the map for assessing subsurface
conditions for open-loop GSHP installations
Help Digital Data Email Feedback Open-loop GSHP Potential © NERC. All rights reserved
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Hover mouse over the face or text for more information

Bedrock aquifer:
Superficial deposits:
Productivity:
Depth to resource:
Temperature:
Potential of the underlying rocks to provide the water that is needed to run an open-loop GSHP, i.e. Potential to provide a suitable bedrock aquifer.
Indicates the presence of superficial deposits. These may in some areas provide an alternative/additional source of water.
Estimated (maximum) rate of water flow that a single borehole (100 m deep) can provide from bedrock aquifer.
Estimated depths to the aquifer or the water table, i.e. how deep to drill to reach the water resource.
Temperature of the ground at 100m beneath the surface, i.e. the approximate temperature of the groundwater.

This Chernoff face gives a visual representation of the overall suitability of the subsurface for open-loop GSHP installations. The different parts of the face represent different suitability aspects:

Mouth

=

Potential of the underlying rocks to provide the water that is needed to run the open-loop GSHP, i.e. to provide a suitable bedrock aquifer. The more smiling the mouth the higher is the aquifer potential of the bedrock.

Eyes

=

Maximum rate of water flow (i.e. yield) that the bedrock aquifer can provide from a (100m*-deep) borehole. The bigger the eyes, the higher are the estimated yields (i.e. the water flow rates).

Nose

=

Minimum depths to the resource, i.e. how deep to drill to reach the aquifer or the water table. The longer the nose the deeper is the resource located beneath the land surface.

Hair

=

Presence of superficial deposits of more than 10m thickness. Such deposits have the potential to provide an additional and/or alternative source of water (i.e. an aquifer). The hair cover indicates that such deposits are present, although further investigations are required to establish their suitability for water abstraction.

Face colour

=

Subsurface temperature at 100m* beneath the land surface, which is used here to approximate the groundwater temperature at that depths. Red represents the highest temperatures and green the lowest temperatures.

* Please note that this depth was randomly chosen as a reference depth and to standardize borehole yields. It has no further significance in the context of open-loop GSHP installations where the optimal depth of the production borehole is determined by factors such as geology and hydrogeology at the given location as well as by the size of the proposed scheme.

Navigation

Move around the map by left-clicking and dragging the mouse in the direction you wish to travel. To zoom in or out of the map, use the vertical slider on the left of the map. Alternatively, you can use the mouse wheel to zoom in and out of the map.

View subsurface details of a given area for open-loop GSHP installations

Left-click on the map to show characteristics of the subsurface in a given area which are relevant for open-loop GSHP installations. These characteristics are summarised in the form of a symbol, a so called Chernoff face (see explanation below), and associated subsurface information are listed alongside to allow the preliminary assessment of the subsurface conditions for open-loop GSHP installations within the area of interest. For further information on how to use this tool, please see: http://www.bgs.ac.uk/downloads/start.cfm?id=2647

Chernoff face

The Chernoff face gives a visual representation of the subsurface characteristics that are relevant for open-loop GSHP installations. The different parts of the face represent different aspects:

Mouth

=

Potential of the underlying rocks to provide the water that is needed to run the open-loop GSHP, i.e. to provide a productive bedrock aquifer. The more smiling the mouth the better (more productive) is the bedrock aquifer.

Eyes

=

Estimated (maximum) rate of water flow that the bedrock aquifer can provide from a single (100m*-deep) borehole. The bigger the eyes, the larger is the volume of water that can be pumped per time unit (e.g., per hour).

Nose

=

Minimum depth to the resource, i.e. how deep to drill to reach the aquifer or the water table. The longer the nose the deeper is the resource located beneath the topographic surface, i.e. the deeper one has to drill.

Hair

=

Presence of superficial deposits of more than 10m thickness. Such deposits have the potential to provide an additionaland/or alternative source of water (i.e. an aquifer). A face with hair indicates that such deposits are present. Note: this does not mean that these deposit can provide an aquifer. Further investigations are required to establish their suitability for water abstraction.

Face colour

=

Subsurface temperature at 100m* beneath the land surface. This is used here to approximate the groundwater temperature at that depths. Red represents the highest temperatures and green the lowest temperatures.

* Please note that this depth was randomly chosen as a reference depth and to standardize borehole yields. It has no further significance in the context of open-loop GSHP installations where the optimal depth of the production borehole is determined by factors such as geology and hydrogeology at the given location as well as by the size of the proposed scheme.

View a key for the map

Click on the 'Map Key' button to see a key for the open-loop GSHP potential map.

Change the map transparency

Use the horizontal slider on the right of the map to alter the transparency of the open-loop GSHP potential map.

Limitations of this tool